You have to hand it to Larry

deal architect

In The New Technology Elite, I cited a 2002 anecdote where Steve Jobs is supposed to have told Dan Wood, founder of Karelia Software, then a partner “You know those handcars, the little machines that people stand on and pump.

How an experienced Asp.net developer multiplied his productivity.

Aymeric Gaurat-Apelli

Skip to content Follow: RSS Email Twitter Aymeric Gaurat-Apelli On building profitable web applications Home Contact me Creations Blog Books Entrepreneurship & Startups General Online experiments Programming tips and tricks Startup tips and tricks Tags productivity , ruby on rails How an experienced Asp.net developer multiplied his productivity ten fold by Aymeric on May 17th, 2010 I have been on the.Net wagon since the beta 1 (2002?) and I have been a.Net consultant since then at Readify. Note: I don’t want to sound arrogant in the next paragraph (bloody Frenchman) but it is important to explain the breadth of my experience with.Net for you to understand why my productivity increase is such a big deal to me. I consider myself proficient in the.Net technologies (no glory, I spend a lot of time in front of my computer). I won the Imagine Cup back in 2004 and I have trained people to pass their MCSD certifications. At Readify , I have been surrounded with people who care about the quality of their work, and it drove the quality of my work up too. In the last two years, my productivity also improved when I started developing and experimenting with my own business ideas during my spare time. The time gap between the moment I have an idea and the moment I can confront it to market validation via some prototypes has too be as short as possible so I am always looking for better ways of doing things. Also I stuck with.Net all these years because I found the tools very powerful (Visual Studio, Resharper, TFS, etc…) and I believed it was hard to beat the productivity a developer gets out of these tools and the framework in general. But something happened in the last month that made a dramatic change to my productivity. I learned Ruby on Rails. How I started I tried Ruby on Rails a few months ago but my experience was very frustrating. I tried to use facebooker in some pet project and all the commands that were explained on the web to use Facebooker wouldn’t work on Windows. But after a discussion with Hendro , founder of Moluko , I decided to give Ruby on Rails another go. Too many smart people liked it. At the time I had to commute 1h20 one way so I downloaded all the videos from RailsCasts and TeachMeToCode on my iPhone. The railscasts are well prepared, and impressive by their depths, this is really advanced stuff. The TeachMeToCode videos are less prepared which is also valuable, you see the guy make and fix his mistakes as he goes for example, you learn how to debug/fix your Ruby on Rails issues. I spent the next three weeks watching videos in the bus/train. So far I have developed two projects in Ruby on Rails. My first project is Eventr. Nothing special to say about it, except this is where I discovered that Heroku and RubyMine are awesome. When the power of RoR unleashed :) This week, I had an idea inspired by fiverr.com : make a fiverr that better respect experts time (by increasing the fixed price) and target businesses only: meet TaskArmy.com. (A post about TaskArmy will probably come soon) As a.net developer I had a glimpse at how powerful Ruby on Rails is: Authentication screens done in 30 minutes Scalable hosting solution set up in 30 minutes Include a new plugin/gem in 10 seconds Reliable and template based emails using PostMark set up in 30 minutes SEO friendly urls done in 30 minutes Encrypted paypal buttons done in 1h (thanks to RailsCasts ) Easy setup of different environment (development / test / production) thanks to separate config files Frictionless deployment (please Microsoft, kill these abominations called TFSBuild scripts) You want your application to automatically tweet? Just use this line (the ` character is important) `curl -u your_username:your_password -d status="#{message}" [link] As an entrepreneur I am excited to foresee the financial benefits of running RoR applications (no licenses to buy) in my businesses. Conclusion I still love.net and continue to think it is more suitable for certain kinds of applications but I wish I had learned Ruby on Rails earlier, I feel I have wasted a lot of my time when I was developing my prototypes in Asp.net. I am really excited to enter a new cycle of productivity. Other articles you might like How to insert the new Tweet button in your ruby on rails application (0) How to develop live search textbox in Ruby on Rails (3) How to redirect all your pages from www to root domain using ruby on rails (3) How to build your own widget in Ruby on Rails in 10 minutes (4) Slides: Why Ruby on Rails rocks? from a.net developer point of view (1) From → Online experiments , Programming tips and tricks 10 Comments → Tristan permalink It’s great until you try and scale it in production ;) Reply Aymeric permalink These guys seem to have gotten over that issue at some point: [link] I can’t wait to have this scaling problem you are talking about! (I would probably have hit this problem in my facebook applications but it would have been reduced thanks to using Heroku) Do you have some horror stories you could share? Reply Dan permalink Way to go Aymeric! Glad to hear it’s going well. Did you check out haml & sass? Reply Aymeric permalink I saw a railscast about LESS ( [link] ) and I like the concept a lot (especially the possibility to use constants in css) (My css in TaskArmy is not complex enough to justify the use of an extra tool at the moment though.) I will definitely look into haml, hopefully my IDE (RubyMine) will handle the new syntax. Reply Stuart permalink Rails scales just like any other platform, you just need to make sure you’re optimising. MYSQL is generally the big bottleneck, make sure you’re indexing properly. Use Fragment Caching to cache parts of pages that don’t change often. Have your DB run on separate dedicated boxes. Reduce page load times by using CDN’s for static content, minify js & css into single files. There’s a huge amount you can do, blaming Rails & saying that it’s no “scalable&# is rubbish. What rails is not good for is concurrent processing, you can use RabbitMQ to delay jobs etc. But that’s not the point, it allows you to get your ideas out quicker & then figure out the scaling problem when you actually have one :) Reply Karthik permalink My experience almost completely mirrors yours. I’m still a.NET dev by day but I’m bootstrapping a startup on Rails in my free time. I started on ASP.NET MVC but quickly realized both financially and technically, the platform wasn’t going to be a good decision moving forward. However I constantly struggle with the question of “am I doing this right?&# with many of the patterns I’ve sort of fallen into with Rails. Have you done code reviews or hack sessions with experienced Rubyists to get their take on your approaches? Reply Aymeric permalink Not yet unfortunately. I don’t know any expert ruby on rails developer at the moment. But it is a good idea, I should look for a RoR “mentor&#. Reply gunteman permalink I have a similar experience, feeling that I have wasted 8 good years developing with ASP.NET. I could have produced so much more if I hadn’t fallen into that trap. ASP.NET MVC2 is quite promising though, especially when used with fuller stacks, such as SharpArchitecture. I guess that’s as far as I will be able to push my co-workers right now. Reply Trackbacks & Pingbacks How an experienced Asp.net developer multiplied his productivity … « ????????????? How to develop live search textbox in Ruby on Rails | Aymeric Gaurat-Apelli Click here to cancel reply. Leave a Reply Recent Articles TaskArmy.com – Pitch Deck for SydStart 2011 Landing page improvements: a case study Today’s learning: Strip your registration page to the essential LivingSocial is preparing a HUGE launch in the australian daily deal market Facebook Places is now available in Australia Is it still possible to be a successful developer on Facebook? Best practices on how to run a Facebook page How to insert the new Tweet button in your ruby on rails application How to develop live search textbox in Ruby on Rails Facebook Consulting Australia: hire my services Categories Blog Books Entrepreneurship & Startups General Online experiments Programming tips and tricks Startup tips and tricks Archives April 2011 March 2011 February 2011 November 2010 October 2010 August 2010 July 2010 June 2010 May 2010 April 2010 March 2010 August 2009 May 2009 April 2009 About Did you know you can write your own about section just like this one? Its really easy. Head into the the Titan Options menu and check out the footer section. Type some stuff in the box, click save, and your new about section shows up in the footer. Wondering about those Flickr photos on the right? We didnt take them, they are a random sampling of the most popular photos on Flickr with the tag nature. All rights are reserved to the original copyright holders where applicable. Flickr Search Copyright © 2011. Titan Theme by The Theme Foundry.

Ruby 39

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.

How an experienced Asp.net developer multiplied his productivity.

Aymeric Gaurat-Apelli

Skip to content Follow: RSS Email Twitter Aymeric Gaurat-Apelli On building profitable web applications Home Contact me Creations Blog Books Entrepreneurship & Startups General Online experiments Programming tips and tricks Startup tips and tricks Tags productivity , ruby on rails How an experienced Asp.net developer multiplied his productivity ten fold by Aymeric on May 17th, 2010 I have been on the.Net wagon since the beta 1 (2002?) and I have been a.Net consultant since then at Readify. Note: I don’t want to sound arrogant in the next paragraph (bloody Frenchman) but it is important to explain the breadth of my experience with.Net for you to understand why my productivity increase is such a big deal to me. I consider myself proficient in the.Net technologies (no glory, I spend a lot of time in front of my computer). I won the Imagine Cup back in 2004 and I have trained people to pass their MCSD certifications. At Readify , I have been surrounded with people who care about the quality of their work, and it drove the quality of my work up too. In the last two years, my productivity also improved when I started developing and experimenting with my own business ideas during my spare time. The time gap between the moment I have an idea and the moment I can confront it to market validation via some prototypes has too be as short as possible so I am always looking for better ways of doing things. Also I stuck with.Net all these years because I found the tools very powerful (Visual Studio, Resharper, TFS, etc…) and I believed it was hard to beat the productivity a developer gets out of these tools and the framework in general. But something happened in the last month that made a dramatic change to my productivity. I learned Ruby on Rails. How I started I tried Ruby on Rails a few months ago but my experience was very frustrating. I tried to use facebooker in some pet project and all the commands that were explained on the web to use Facebooker wouldn’t work on Windows. But after a discussion with Hendro , founder of Moluko , I decided to give Ruby on Rails another go. Too many smart people liked it. At the time I had to commute 1h20 one way so I downloaded all the videos from RailsCasts and TeachMeToCode on my iPhone. The railscasts are well prepared, and impressive by their depths, this is really advanced stuff. The TeachMeToCode videos are less prepared which is also valuable, you see the guy make and fix his mistakes as he goes for example, you learn how to debug/fix your Ruby on Rails issues. I spent the next three weeks watching videos in the bus/train. So far I have developed two projects in Ruby on Rails. My first project is Eventr. Nothing special to say about it, except this is where I discovered that Heroku and RubyMine are awesome. When the power of RoR unleashed :) This week, I had an idea inspired by fiverr.com : make a fiverr that better respect experts time (by increasing the fixed price) and target businesses only: meet TaskArmy.com. (A post about TaskArmy will probably come soon) As a.net developer I had a glimpse at how powerful Ruby on Rails is: Authentication screens done in 30 minutes Scalable hosting solution set up in 30 minutes Include a new plugin/gem in 10 seconds Reliable and template based emails using PostMark set up in 30 minutes SEO friendly urls done in 30 minutes Encrypted paypal buttons done in 1h (thanks to RailsCasts ) Easy setup of different environment (development / test / production) thanks to separate config files Frictionless deployment (please Microsoft, kill these abominations called TFSBuild scripts) You want your application to automatically tweet? Just use this line (the ` character is important) `curl -u your_username:your_password -d status="#{message}" [link] As an entrepreneur I am excited to foresee the financial benefits of running RoR applications (no licenses to buy) in my businesses. Conclusion I still love.net and continue to think it is more suitable for certain kinds of applications but I wish I had learned Ruby on Rails earlier, I feel I have wasted a lot of my time when I was developing my prototypes in Asp.net. I am really excited to enter a new cycle of productivity. Other articles you might like How to insert the new Tweet button in your ruby on rails application (0) How to develop live search textbox in Ruby on Rails (3) How to redirect all your pages from www to root domain using ruby on rails (3) How to build your own widget in Ruby on Rails in 10 minutes (4) Slides: Why Ruby on Rails rocks? from a.net developer point of view (1) From → Online experiments , Programming tips and tricks 10 Comments → Tristan permalink It’s great until you try and scale it in production ;) Reply Aymeric permalink These guys seem to have gotten over that issue at some point: [link] I can’t wait to have this scaling problem you are talking about! (I would probably have hit this problem in my facebook applications but it would have been reduced thanks to using Heroku) Do you have some horror stories you could share? Reply Dan permalink Way to go Aymeric! Glad to hear it’s going well. Did you check out haml & sass? Reply Aymeric permalink I saw a railscast about LESS ( [link] ) and I like the concept a lot (especially the possibility to use constants in css) (My css in TaskArmy is not complex enough to justify the use of an extra tool at the moment though.) I will definitely look into haml, hopefully my IDE (RubyMine) will handle the new syntax. Reply Stuart permalink Rails scales just like any other platform, you just need to make sure you’re optimising. MYSQL is generally the big bottleneck, make sure you’re indexing properly. Use Fragment Caching to cache parts of pages that don’t change often. Have your DB run on separate dedicated boxes. Reduce page load times by using CDN’s for static content, minify js & css into single files. There’s a huge amount you can do, blaming Rails & saying that it’s no “scalable&# is rubbish. What rails is not good for is concurrent processing, you can use RabbitMQ to delay jobs etc. But that’s not the point, it allows you to get your ideas out quicker & then figure out the scaling problem when you actually have one :) Reply Karthik permalink My experience almost completely mirrors yours. I’m still a.NET dev by day but I’m bootstrapping a startup on Rails in my free time. I started on ASP.NET MVC but quickly realized both financially and technically, the platform wasn’t going to be a good decision moving forward. However I constantly struggle with the question of “am I doing this right?&# with many of the patterns I’ve sort of fallen into with Rails. Have you done code reviews or hack sessions with experienced Rubyists to get their take on your approaches? Reply Aymeric permalink Not yet unfortunately. I don’t know any expert ruby on rails developer at the moment. But it is a good idea, I should look for a RoR “mentor&#. Reply gunteman permalink I have a similar experience, feeling that I have wasted 8 good years developing with ASP.NET. I could have produced so much more if I hadn’t fallen into that trap. ASP.NET MVC2 is quite promising though, especially when used with fuller stacks, such as SharpArchitecture. I guess that’s as far as I will be able to push my co-workers right now. Reply Trackbacks & Pingbacks How an experienced Asp.net developer multiplied his productivity … « ????????????? How to develop live search textbox in Ruby on Rails | Aymeric Gaurat-Apelli Click here to cancel reply. Leave a Reply Recent Articles TaskArmy.com – Pitch Deck for SydStart 2011 Landing page improvements: a case study Today’s learning: Strip your registration page to the essential LivingSocial is preparing a HUGE launch in the australian daily deal market Facebook Places is now available in Australia Is it still possible to be a successful developer on Facebook? Best practices on how to run a Facebook page How to insert the new Tweet button in your ruby on rails application How to develop live search textbox in Ruby on Rails Facebook Consulting Australia: hire my services Categories Blog Books Entrepreneurship & Startups General Online experiments Programming tips and tricks Startup tips and tricks Archives April 2011 March 2011 February 2011 November 2010 October 2010 August 2010 July 2010 June 2010 May 2010 April 2010 March 2010 August 2009 May 2009 April 2009 About Did you know you can write your own about section just like this one? Its really easy. Head into the the Titan Options menu and check out the footer section. Type some stuff in the box, click save, and your new about section shows up in the footer. Wondering about those Flickr photos on the right? We didnt take them, they are a random sampling of the most popular photos on Flickr with the tag nature. All rights are reserved to the original copyright holders where applicable. Flickr Search Copyright © 2011. Titan Theme by The Theme Foundry.

Ruby 36

@altgate » Blog Archive » But What Does It Mean?

Altgate

The chart shows how the US economy is currently shedding jobs at a rate much higher than in the most recent recessions (2002 and 1990).

Prevailing Wisdom

Mucker Lab

2002 – “the social network fad is over”. 2002 – “Information Technology is not a competitive advantage”. 2002 – “Consumer electronics is a low margin and highly competitive industry”. 1994 – “Consumers are fickle and unpredictable.

We Were Right – Just a Decade Early

Feld Thoughts

2002 was the Trough of Disillusionment. 2001 – 2002 was the collapse to the Trough. This is a line my friend Jerry Colonna uses when something like the AT&T – Time Warner deal occurs.

Merger 199

DUDE Agency Podcast – The Self-Reliant Entrepreneur

Duct Tape Marketing

John Jantsch, author of Duct Tape Marketing , shares how his marketing consulting firm grew from a book published in 2002 into a marketing system that’s used to help agency owners and their clients achieve great results. DUDE Agency Podcast – The Self-Reliant Entrepreneur written by John Jantsch read more at Duct Tape Marketing.

Prevailing Wisdom

Mucker Lab

2002 – “the social network fad is over”. 2002 – “Information Technology is not a competitive advantage”. 2002 – “Consumer electronics is a low margin and highly competitive industry”. 1994 – “Consumers are fickle and unpredictable. Consumer products and services are hit driven, it’s really hard to build a scalable consumer company”. Internet). 1996 – “It’s impossible to get to build a billion dollar company selling widgets at $15 and taking $1 commission one at a time”.

Playing Startup

View from Seed

But the first real time we had a big celebration and folks felt like we’d “made it” was the party we held in the parking lot on February 14, 2002 when PayPal went public. I’ve observed what may be an emerging trend, at least in some startups, that I find somewhat unsettling.

Reinventing Austin Women in Technology

SiliconHills

When it started, in 2002, it was fueled by the [.] BY SUSAN LAHEY Reporter with Silicon Hills News The way advisory board member Sherry Lowry remembers it, Austin Women in Technology used to be the one place in Austin where women with the audacity to infiltrate the Old Geeks network—and women intrigued by technology—could converge. The post Reinventing Austin Women in Technology appeared first on SiliconHills. Austin Technology

The wrong question: Is now the right time to start a company?

A Smart Bear: Startups and Marketing for Geeks

I started Smart Bear in a recession (2002) and it went great. The answer is always yes. But it’s the wrong question. I’ve been explaining for eight years why recessions are a great time to start a company.

Business Lessons Often Ignored In The Heat Of Passion

Startup Professionals Musings

For example, the personal motorized scooter Segway was announced as disruptive technology way back in 2002, but is still not a successful business. Most aspiring entrepreneurs are convinced that their idea and passion are so great that failure is not a possibility. They relate quickly to one of the big successes out there today, including Facebook, Airbnb, or Snap, and can give you a dozen reasons that they are in the same category.

5 Steps To Strategy Tuning Through Machine Learning

Startup Professionals Musings

Way back in 2002, Jeff Bezos at Amazon issued an ultimatum to completely institute internal APIs within the company, and later to their millions of suppliers.

Alice Seba: How This Canadian Mother-Of-Three Sold Over A Million Dollars Worth Of Content Other People Created

Entrepreneurs-Journey.com by Yaro Starak

? [ Download MP3 | Transcript | iTunes | Soundcloud | Raw RSS ] Alice Seba started out online in 2002, after the birth of her first child. She wanted to figure out a way to avoid working a job so she could spend more time with her son. The post Alice Seba: How This Canadian Mother-Of-Three Sold Over A Million Dollars Worth Of Content Other People Created appeared first on Entrepreneurs-Journey.com. Do you have an online business but hate writing content?

RSS 62

Early Stage VCs – Be Careful Out There

Feld Thoughts

By 2002 investments at the seed level had evaporated (there were almost no seed financings happening). In addition to our own funds, we are investors in a number of other early-stage VC funds as part of our Foundry Group Next strategy. Yesterday, in one of the quarterly updates that we get, I saw the following paragraph. “Historically, the $10 million valuation mark has been somewhat of a ceiling for seed stage startups.

Bitcoin: things only grow this fast when something important is happening

The Equity Kicker

In around 2002 I was stuck in my hotel room in Egypt due to food poisoning and the only English TV available was an American business channel. Coindesk just published their quarterly ‘ State of Bitcoin ‘ presentation.

Egypt 152

Not Every Startup Is “Killing It” (How to Speak Up During Tough Times)

View from Seed

We went public in 2002 and eBay bought the company later that year for over $1.5 The startup ecosystem is often full of hyperbole, which is perfectly understandable when you think about it.

It’s Time to Play Moneyball: The Investment Readiness Level

Steve Blank

Until 2002 – when the Oakland A’s’ baseball team took advantage of analytical metrics of player performance to field a team that competed successfully against much richer competitors.

The Great Winnowing of World Cup & The Startup Ecosystem

Agile VC

Picture I took in 2002 of WC stadium Daegu, South Korea. Those of you who know me are probably aware that I’m a rabid soccer (football) fan.

Playing Startup

Agile VC

But the first real time we had a big celebration and folks felt like we’d “made it” was the party we held in the parking lot on February 14, 2002 when PayPal went public.

How to Divide Founder Equity: 4 Criteria to Discuss

View from Seed

For example, when we started LinkedIn at the end of 2002, each member of the founding team essentially had a couple chunks of founders’ common stock.

Equity 325

The Blockchain: Ending Data Hacks

View from Seed

In 2002, online commerce accounted for just 1.6% Remember when we were scared to buy things online?

It Can All Go To Zero

Feld Thoughts

” In 2002 Interliant went bankrupt and the stock went to $0. Perspective can be a useful thing. Cryptocurrencies have had a bad 24 hours. Last night Amy and I watched The Big Short for the second time. If you’ve never seen it, it’s a must watch movie.

Stock 138

New Survey from Fenwick & West Looks at Angel Funding Landscape

ReadWriteStart

Since 2002, the law form of Fenwick & West has conducted a venture capital survey, a response to "the burst of the 'dot-come bubble' and a desire to provide the entrepreneurial community with objective information about the status of the venture environment."

A Look at What’s Fueling Startup Investments in Colombia

ReadWriteStart

In 2002, the city established Medellín ACI at (Medillín ACI.org), is the Agency for Investment and Cooperation. The Latin American startup scene is attracting more and more attention and investments.

Every Generation Learns The Same Lessons

Feld Thoughts

Last night, at the Aspen Entrepreneurs event, I was asked to describe several failures and I rolled out my story about Interliant, which, for a period of time (1999 – 2000) appeared to be hugely successful before going bankrupt in 2002.

Jason Vanclef Discusses His Business Model

The Startup Magazine

In 2002, he founded the Vanclef Financial Group, becoming an independent advisor. Jason Vanclef is the CEO of Vanclef Financial Group, Inc. His company is dedicated to helping people achieve their financial goals.

Taking Corporate VC: When It Makes Sense

View from Seed

Fortunately we proved skeptics wrong and every one of these strategic investors made a tidy 2.5 – 3x return once PayPal IPO’d in 2002 and then was acquired by eBay later that year.

Category Collapse

Feld Thoughts

If you lived through the Internet-bubble between 1999 and 2002 you know this cycle well. It’s the second week of December, which is about the time that all of the predictions for 2019 start occurring. Last week’s announcements of the confidential S-1 filing of Lyft, Uber, and Slack helped prime the pump for some of these. By the way, did anyone other than me think it was a strange turn of events that companies are now announcing their confidential S-1 filing?

DC 102

Israelis Getting More Recognition for Brain than their Brawn

VC Cafe

Danny has become the 6th Israeli to win the Nobel prize in a scientific field since the year 2002, and the 10th Israeli to win a Nobel Prize overall. Israelis have accumulated four Nobel Prizes in Chemistry, and two in Economics since 2002.

Iowa 102

You Built a Great Startup, But Can You Scale It?

Startup Professionals Musings

Way back in 2002, John Hamm published some early work on this subject in " Why Entrepreneurs Don't Scale " in the Harvard Business Review.

What Are Pre-Seed Rounds and Why Do They Exist?

View from Seed

In the years immediately prior to the popularity of institutional seed investing (I’m using a time frame of 2002 – 2007), the early-stage financing landscape looked similar to the first segment of the chart. This is the first of several blog posts discussing pre-seed rounds.

Why Young Entrepreneurs Should Start Investing In Coins

YoungUpstarts

A 1933 Saint-Gaudens Double Eagle was sold at an auction for more than $7 million in 2002. Entrepreneurs are getting younger these days. It’s not surprising to see 20-somethings creating innovations, starting their businesses, investing in the stock market, and more.

7 Good Entrepreneurial Habits That Turn Bad

Startup Professionals Musings

For example, there once was a social network called Friendster , often credited with starting the social networking boom way back in 2002.

Demand 227

Helping Entrepreneurs Succeed: Larry Page

Scott Edward Walker

To Our Clients & Friends: Welcome to our weekly series “ Helping Entrepreneurs Succeed.” Each week, we share a favorite video of a successful entrepreneur, investor or business leader on a variety of topics.

Manage And Schedule Appointments With TimeCenter

YoungUpstarts

Marie had been running a web development shop nicmar media since 2002, and had developed an online appointment scheduler for two of Sweden’s biggest companies in 2005.

Playing Startup

Agile VC

But the first real time we had a big celebration and folks felt like we’d “made it” was the party we held in the parking lot on February 14, 2002 when PayPal went public.

Not Everyone Is “Killing” It: How & When to Admit It

Agile VC

We went public in 2002 and eBay bought the company later that year for over $1.5 Note: This post also published at NextView’s blog for seed stage companies The View From Seed. The startup ecosystem is often full of hyperbole, which is perfectly understandable when you think about it.

Niklas Zennström on Atomico’s investment strategy and Europe’s evolving startup ecosystem [Video]

The Next Web

Niklas also talks about how the European startup scene has changed, in his view, since he co-founded Skype with Janus Friis back in 2002.

Europe 130

You Don’t Need To Change Your Company Culture To Attract Millennials

YoungUpstarts

Deutser launched his firm in 2002. by Brad Deutser, president of Deutser LLC. Employers spend a lot of time puzzling over what they need to do to attract millennials and how to retain those young employees once they hire them.

LLC 176

The Long And Short Of Rebranding Your Business

YoungUpstarts

In 2002, Hewlett Packard signed a merger agreement with Compaq that would bring together the computer hardware businesses of the two businesses, each with revenues of over $40 billion. So between 2002 and 2007, Compaq continued to use their logo with little change.

Merger 151

Hacking For Defense In Silicon Valley

Steve Blank

In Afghanistan in 2002 U.S. Lead, follow or get the heck out of the way. In peacetime the U.S. military is an immovable and inflexible bureaucracy. In wartime it can adapt and adopt organizational change with startling speed.

Entrepreneurs: Don’t Make This Costly Financial Planning Mistake

YoungUpstarts

adapted from “ The Entrepreneur’s Guide to Financial Well-Being “ AMDG Financial and AMDG Business Advisory Services in 2002, he spent fifteen years at two large accounting firms, working with Fortune 50 clients.

Cost 182