Startup Metrics for Pirates: SeedCamp 2009 (Sept 2009, London.

500 Hats

Startonomics SF 2008) Startup Metrics: Sample User Conversion Dashboard Startup Metrics: Example Marketing Channels Startup Metrics: The 1-Page Business Model Successful Developer Platforms Have 3 Things: Features, Users, Money. Posted by Dave on Wednesday, September 23, 2009 at 05:18 AM in Geeks, Tech, Startups , Marvelous Marketing , Metrics & Measurement , Social Networking & Social Media , Venture Capital & Startup Finance | Permalink Digg This | Save to del.icio.us

The Principles of Product Development Flow

Startup Lessons Learned

Lessons Learned by Eric Ries Monday, July 13, 2009 The Principles of Product Development Flow If youve ever wondered why agile or lean development techniques work, The Principles of Product Development Flow: Second Generation Lean Product Development by Donald G.

Trending Sources

Raising Money Using Customer Development

Steve Blank

This post describes how companies using the Customer Development model can increase their credibility, valuation and probability of getting a first round of funding by presenting their results in a “Lesson Learned&# venture pitch. Raising Money Using Customer Development « Steve Blank [.]

Startup Software Development – Do Your Homework Before You Develop Anything

SoCal CTO

I just had an all-too common conversation with the founder of a startup who had spent more than a year working with a software development company who had produced a mess. The mess really comes from a developer who was willing to get started on a product that was not fully thought out. If I’m being asked to do startup software development, I’m going to push fairly hard on key questions that the startup needs to have answered before they develop anything.

Your SOLUTION is Not My PROBLEM - Master of 500 Hats

500 Hats

Startonomics SF 2008) Startup Metrics: Sample User Conversion Dashboard Startup Metrics: Example Marketing Channels Startup Metrics: The 1-Page Business Model Successful Developer Platforms Have 3 Things: Features, Users, Money. Friday, August 07, 2009 at 01:32 PM Spot on, as usual, DMC.

Customer Development is Not a Focus Group

Steve Blank

Customer Development is all about gathering a list of what features customers want by talking to them, surveying them, or running “focus groups.” Customer Development is about Testing the Founder’s Hypothesis Any idiot can get outside the building and ask customers what they want, compile a feature list and hand it to engineering. And it’s certainly not Customer Development. Reply Brent , on December 18, 2009 at 8:50 pm Said: Mark, you hit the nail on the head.

Startup Therapy: Ten questions to ask yourself every month

A Smart Bear: Startups and Marketing for Geeks

We get caught up in free-but-takes-tons-of-time marketing and development activities — and most of the time that's a good way to think — but sometimes it's still true that "you have to spend money to make money.".

The “Good” Student « Steve Blank

Steve Blank

Reply Jesse Farmer , on April 7, 2009 at 8:53 am Said: Customers don’t ask for your transcript. Martin , on April 7, 2009 at 9:40 am Said: There’s a wide spectrum between A student and dropout. From the king of customer development, Steve Blank: [.]

Epitaph for an Entrepreneur « Steve Blank

Steve Blank

Out of Stanford Business School she went to work for Apple as an evangelist and then joined Ansa Software , the developer of Paradox, a Mac-database. My ideas about Customer Development started evolving around these concepts. thanks Reply Ben Yoskovitz , on June 18, 2009 at 7:13 am Said: Steve – Great post. Reply Rob Di Marco , on June 18, 2009 at 8:05 am Said: Thanks for this wonderful post. on June 18, 2009 at 10:38 am Said: [.]

Pivot, don't jump to a new vision

Startup Lessons Learned

Lessons Learned by Eric Ries Monday, June 22, 2009 Pivot, dont jump to a new vision In a lean startup , instead of being organized around traditional functional departments, we use a cross-functional problem team and solution team. Each has its own iterative process: customer development and agile development respectively. The hardest part of entrepreneurship is to develop the judgment to know when its time to change direction and when its time to stay the course.

Save Your Spin for Someone Who Cares

Both Sides of the Table

Our call recovered and we spent the rest of the time talking about the development of their management team and their product. Handling PR with VCs. This is part of my series on How to Raise VC but could equally be filed under Startup Advice more generally.

PR 87

Transitioning from Developer to Software Entrepreneur

Software By Rob

Software by Rob Passionate about Startups and MicroISVs Lessons Learned by a Serial Entrepreneur home about press micropreneurs archives ← The Future of the Web is Small, Academic Earth, Beatles Rock Band, Top Developer Blogs, et al.

How to Pitch a VC (aka Startup Viagra: How to Give a VC a Hard-On.

500 Hats

Startonomics SF 2008) Startup Metrics: Sample User Conversion Dashboard Startup Metrics: Example Marketing Channels Startup Metrics: The 1-Page Business Model Successful Developer Platforms Have 3 Things: Features, Users, Money.

Customer Development Manifesto: The Path of Warriors and Winners.

Steve Blank

This post describes a solution – the Customer Development Model. In future posts I’ll describe how Eric Ries and the Lean Startup concept provide the equivalent model for product development activities inside the building and neatly integrates customer and agile development.

Relentless – The Difference Between Motion And Action

Steve Blank

Lessons Learned Most people execute linearly, step by step They measure progress by “steps they did&# Entrepreneurs focus on the goal They measure progress by “accomplishing their goals&# Filed under: Ardent , Customer Development , Family/Career « Raising Money Using Customer Development “Lessons Learned” – A New Type of Venture Capital Pitch » 38 Responses Michael F. Reply steveblank , on November 9, 2009 at 2:49 pm Said: You got it.

Most Common Early Start-up Mistakes

Both Sides of the Table

Would you want to run the risk that your former employer could have a claim against the intellectual property you’ve created because you broke company policies and developed your ideas on company resources? In some countries outside the US (the UK for example) employers can specify in an employment contract that ANY IP you develop while you’re employed by that company is owned by them.

IP 82

The Leading Cause of Startup Death – Part 1: The Product.

Steve Blank

This series of posts is a brief explanation of how we’ve evolved from Product Development to Customer Development to the Lean Startup. The Product Development Diagram Emerging early in the twentieth century, this product-centric model described a process that evolved in manufacturing industries. Our investors used the product development diagram in our board meeting to see if we were “on plan&# and “on schedule.&#

“Speed and Tempo” – Fearless Decision Making for Startups « Steve.

Steve Blank

Customer Development ) to help you quickly recognize and reverse any incorrect decisions. Filed under: Customer Development , Technology | Tagged: Customer Development , Early Stage Startup , Entrepreneurs , Startups , Steve Blank « SuperMac War Story 6: Building The Killer Team – Mission, Intent and Values Story Behind “The Secret History” Part IV: Library Hours at an Undisclosed Location » 17 Responses Michael F.

Minimum Viable Product: a guide

Startup Lessons Learned

Lessons Learned by Eric Ries Monday, August 3, 2009 Minimum Viable Product: a guide One of the most important lean startup techniques is called the minimum viable product. August 3, 2009 10:52 AM Chris Hopf said. August 3, 2009 11:49 AM Jason Brownlee said. August 3, 2009 8:08 PM William Mitchell said. You refer to an anonymous Valley-based MMORPG that consumed years and tens of millions in development, but got little commercial traction.

Startup Metrics That Matter (FoWA London, Oct 2009) - Master of.

500 Hats

Startonomics SF 2008) Startup Metrics: Sample User Conversion Dashboard Startup Metrics: Example Marketing Channels Startup Metrics: The 1-Page Business Model Successful Developer Platforms Have 3 Things: Features, Users, Money.

Embrace technical debt

Startup Lessons Learned

Lessons Learned by Eric Ries Wednesday, July 29, 2009 Embrace technical debt Financial debt plays an important and positive role in our economy under normal conditions. Like a financial debt, the technical debt incurs interest payments, which come in the form of the extra effort that we have to do in future development because of the quick and dirty design choice. The biggest source of waste in new product development is building something that nobody wants.

Lean 47

Free Customer Development Help – Survey.io

Startup Marketing Blog

Startup Marketing Blog – By Sean Ellis Unlocking Startup Growth By Sean Ellis of 12in6 May 18th 09 Free Customer Development Help – Survey.io I’m excited to announce a project that I’ve been working on with KISSmetrics called Survey.io , which provides startups with a free and easy way to prepare, distribute and analyze an initial customer development survey. I strongly encourage you to setup and run your own customer development survey via Survey.io.

Document Your MVP for a Developer

SoCal CTO

He wanted to get input from me on what he's doing, and he wants to begin to ask developers what it would take to build his product. what format would you and the developer want that in? Conversations with a technical advisors or possible developers should be iterative.

Milestones to Startup Success

Startup Marketing Blog

Posted in Acquiring Customers , Branding , Building Awareness , Business models , Competitors , Customer Development , Positioning , Product/market fit , word-of-mouth. 59 Responses to “Milestones to Startup Success&# Sarah Prevette Nov 30, 2009 7:52 pm This is an incredible post – a must read for any entrepreneur. Neil Nov 30, 2009 8:02 pm Wow! Sean Nov 30, 2009 8:11 pm Thanks Neil, I appreciate the positive feedback. Tracy Nov 30, 2009 8:21 pm great post!

Lessons Learned: Don't launch

Startup Lessons Learned

Lessons Learned by Eric Ries Friday, March 13, 2009 Dont launch Heres a common question I get from startups, especially in the early stages: when should we launch? Do some Customer Development instead. Hold yourself and your PR agency accountable for developing a high level of understanding of these questions ahead of time. March 13, 2009 1:50 PM dan simard said. March 13, 2009 2:14 PM Alan Pinstein said. Alan March 13, 2009 2:18 PM alon said.

Lean 47

Customer Development Manifesto: Market Type (part 4) « Steve Blank

Steve Blank

In future posts I’ll describe how Eric Ries and the Lean Startup concept provided the equivalent model for product development activities inside the building and neatly integrates customer and agile development. The product development model treats all startups like they are in an Existing Market – an established market with known customers. As a result, the standard product development model is not only useless, it is dangerous.

Lessons Learned: Validated learning about customers

Startup Lessons Learned

Lessons Learned by Eric Ries Tuesday, April 14, 2009 Validated learning about customers Would you rather have $30,000 or $1 million in revenues for your startup? Their product development team is hard at work on a next-generation product platform, which is designed to offer a new suite of products – but this effort is months behind schedule. And what of the product development team? Labels: agile , customer development 15comments: Scott Shapiro said.

Don’t Roll out the Red Carpet on the Way out the Door

Both Sides of the Table

You develop a cynicism that the future will be better. This is part of my Startup Advice series. Before I started my first company in 1999 I worked for Andersen Consulting (now Accenture).

The Startup Pyramid

Startup Marketing Blog

Startup Marketing Blog – By Sean Ellis Unlocking Startup Growth By Sean Ellis of 12in6 The Startup Pyramid Every six months I rethink the optimal startup go to market approach based on new insights gained at recent startups. Lately I’ve been using a pyramid to represent the process I’m using. Startups require a solid foundation of product/market fit before progressing up the pyramid and scaling the business.

Why vanity metrics are dangerous

Startup Lessons Learned

Lessons Learned by Eric Ries Wednesday, December 23, 2009 Why vanity metrics are dangerous In a previous post, I defined two kinds of metrics: vanity metrics and actionable metrics. If all the engineers work on the same thing at the same time, and all the marketers do the same, and QA, and ops, all the way down the line, then each department develops its own team-based private reality. The Entrepreneur’s Guide to Customer Development ► June (3) What is a startup?

How to conduct a Five Whys root cause analysis

Startup Lessons Learned

Lessons Learned by Eric Ries Thursday, July 2, 2009 How to conduct a Five Whys root cause analysis In the lean startup workshops , we’ve spent a lot of time discussing the technique of Five Whys. It allows teams to diagnose sources of waste in their development process and continuously improve, reversing the usual trend of teams getting slower over time. As teams get experience doing Five Whys, they start to develop rules of thumb for what is reasonable and what isn’t.

The Steve Jobs method

Startup Lessons Learned

Lessons Learned by Eric Ries Saturday, August 1, 2009 The Steve Jobs method Image via CrunchBase Its been a long time since I did a post that was primarily a link to another blog with commentary, but I came across something today that I really want to share. For one, capacity development.

Lean 37

Lessons Learned: Venture Hacks interview: "What is the minimum.

Startup Lessons Learned

Lessons Learned by Eric Ries Monday, March 23, 2009 Venture Hacks interview: "What is the minimum viable product?" Solving the chicken-and-egg platform problem Developers don’t want to develop unless there are customers who are there to buy their products, and customers don’t want to come on the platform unless developers are there selling them something useful. Thanks Hazem March 23, 2009 6:46 PM Knowist said. March 30, 2009 8:40 PM illscience said.

Lean 38

WTF is Traction? A 6-Step Relationship Guide to VC

Both Sides of the Table

Traction can simply mean showing that you’re making progress with customers, product development, channel partners, initial revenue as a proof point, attracting well-known angel investors, winning industry awards / recognition. Funding is about developing a relationship over time. This is part of my ongoing series “Pitching a VC&# – the outline is here. You’ve pitched several angels and VC’s.

Start-ups are all Naked in the Mirror

Both Sides of the Table

Our business development discussions took longer than planned. We downsized, developed processes and found our groove. I think the fondest memories and bonds in life are developed between people who go through shit like this all together and come out survivors. We developed deep kinship. You need to understand the impact of your competitor developments and learn from them. This is part of my ongoing series Startup Lessons. Building companies is hard work.

Should Your Startup Have an Advisory Board?

Both Sides of the Table

But I would argue that you can develop relationships with many advisers, mentors and VCs that will help with introductions for no equity. This is part of my ongoing series Startup Advice. Many startup companies hire advisory boards. It’s very tempting.

Lessons Learned: Work in small batches

Startup Lessons Learned

Lessons Learned by Eric Ries Friday, February 20, 2009 Work in small batches Software should be designed, written, and deployed in small batches. The batch size is the unit at which work-products move between stages in a development process. Take the example of a design team prepping mock-ups for their development team. And over time, the development team may be able to start anticipating your needs. That frees up even more development resources, and so on.

Lean 36

What Makes an Entrepreneur? (1/11) – Tenacity

Both Sides of the Table

Having been through the experience as an entrepreneur twice myself I have developed a list of what I think it takes. This is part of my new series on what makes an entrepreneur successful. I originally posted it on VentureHacks , one of my favorite websites for entrepreneurs.

Who Should you Hire at a Startup?

Both Sides of the Table

At your stage of development do you really think a shit-hot VP Sales is going to join you to head up sales? Only Hire A+ People Who Punch Above Their Weight Class. This is part of my ongoing posts on Startup Advice.

The Customer Development Manifesto: Reasons for the Revolution.

Steve Blank

After 20 years of working in startups, I decided to take a step back and look at the product development model I had been following and see why it usually failed to provide useful guidance in activities outside the building – sales, marketing and business development. Every startup has some methodology for product development, launch and life-cycle management. So what’s wrong the product development model? Product Development Diagram 1.