The Innovation Serengeti

deal architect

Have you been to Kenya or Tanzania during the annual wildebeest (and zebra and others) migration? It is an amazing sight to see the thundering herds seek out greener pastures. The New Florence blog feels as dynamic. Through July, there. Innovative Business Uses of Technology

Heart of Smartness: A Tech Accelerator for Africa

ReadWriteStart

Alliy is managing partner of the Savannah Fund , a $10 million fund that will soon begin investing in technology startups in East Africa, including Rwanda, Tanzania, Uganda and Kenya. My 3G connection in Tanzania is better than what I get in San Francisco. Africa has most of the elements required for technology innovation. What it doesn’t have is a startup culture where smart young entrepreneurs can grow their ideas into companies.

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For tech to develop in emerging economies, the first obstacle is trust

The Next Web

industry in Tanzania. Riding the wave of global awareness for the need to stay competitive, Tanzania has taken some positive steps forwards, including government investments in a fibreoptic backbone as well as strategic initiatives around promoting start-ups. In Tanzania the ubiquity of platforms such as M-Pesa have given millions of poor people access to financial services for the first time and created the potential for entering the online marketplace.

Are You Living An Adventure-Starved Life? 11 Ways To Shake Things Up

YoungUpstarts

by Vella Mbenna, author of “ Muddy Roads Blue Skies: My Journey to the Foreign Service, From the Rural South to Tanzania and Beyond “ Have you fallen into a routine of drudgery? Vella Mbenna is the author of “ Muddy Roads Blue Skies: My Journey to the Foreign Service, From the Rural South to Tanzania and Beyond “ Throughout her youth, Vella dreamed of escaping small-town USA and traveling the world.

Startup Strategy Roundtable: African Tech Entrepreneurs Emerging

ReadWriteStart

And it was really cool to see a company from Tanzania. Next Taha Jiwaji of Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, gave us an interesting snapshot of some opportunities opening up in Africa. I liked all of the companies that were presented at this week's roundtable.

Heart of Smartness: A Tech Accelerator for Africa

ReadWriteStart

Alliy is managing partner of the Savannah Fund , a $10 million fund that will soon begin investing in technology startups in East Africa, including Rwanda, Tanzania, Uganda and Kenya. My 3G connection in Tanzania is better than what I get in San Francisco. Africa has most of the elements required for technology innovation. What it doesn’t have is a startup culture where smart young entrepreneurs can grow their ideas into companies.

Three Megatrends That Will Affect Everybody’s Business

YoungUpstarts

Over the next five years, some African economies (Ethiopia, Mozambique and Tanzania, just to name a few) are likely to grow as fast as, or faster, than some of the recent Asian champions. by Professor Dominique V. Turpin, president of IMD. The future is hard to predict and a lot of “experts” regularly get it wrong. However, there are some facts so important and trends so inevitable that leaders would be ill-advised to ignore and not try to anticipate.

Traveling the world, meeting startups: What We learned

The Next Web

The Next Web’s Startup World – the global competition to promote entrepreneurship and startup culture globally- traveled to Mexico City, Peru, Chile, Buenos Aires, Brazil, South Africa, Kenya, Rwanda and Tanzania August and September this year – we met over 1500 entrepreneurs, investors and hackers from tech ecosystems around the world.

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Heart of Smartness: A Tech Accelerator for Africa

ReadWriteStart

Alliy is managing partner of the Savannah Fund , a $10 million fund that will soon begin investing in technology startups in East Africa, including Rwanda, Tanzania, Uganda and Kenya. My 3G connection in Tanzania is better than what I get in San Francisco. Africa has most of the elements required for technology innovation. What it doesn’t have is a startup culture where smart young entrepreneurs can grow their ideas into companies.

10 Amazing Microfinance Success Stories

YoungUpstarts

Reuben Mpunda, Tanzania. The benefits of microfinance have been debated since the ’70s when the Grameen Bank in Bangladesh began making tiny loans to impoverished small business owners. In 2006, Muhammad Yunus, the bank’s founder and “the father of microfinance,” won the Nobel Peace Prize. Since that time, at least one study has shown the practice does little to empower women in oppressed cultures or improve quality of life for poor people.

How We're Hiring at Receeve

Babbling VC

I couldn't care less whether you're in the office or working from Tanzania. Michael and I have been at this game quite a while at this point. Nevertheless, one thing I realized is that I often repeat myself to both people whom we are hiring or whom we are telling about what we do. We have a very specific type of person whom we like to hire. Further, both Michael and I have our very own styles of management (or in my case, lack of management) and we compliment one another greatly.

Creating a movement

VC Cafe

We’re now over 500 strong, and have raised over $500,000 which were used to build 6 schools, 14 libraries and 300 scholarships for girls in Nepal, India, Bangladesh, Cambodia, Vietnam and Tanzania. “Unless someone like you cares a whole awful lot, Nothing is going to get better. It’s not.” — Dr. Seuss, The Lorax. I’ve started a 30 day blogging challenge (more about it here and please sign up to receive the newsletter ). This is day Seven. Techbikers 2017 – finish line.

Rethinking Impact Investing

thebarefootvc

My parents, who were both born and raised in different parts of Tanzania, were determined to show us the material poverty (and outsized generosity) of people on our first trip to India. Impact investing, venture philanthropy and social entrepreneurship are all areas in practice and theory that have been close to my heart for years. As regular readers of my blog know, I was born in Nairobi and grew up visiting the developing world in the 1980s, after my family moved to the United States.

Bankless Banking Is Ready For Its Close-Up

YoungUpstarts

In Kenya and Tanzania, over 25 million people use the M-Pesa mobile payments platform, operated by Safaricom and Vodacom, with money sent via text message. by Harold Montgomery, Chairman and CEO of MoneyOnMobile. More than a third of the global population has no access to traditional financial services. Access to financial services can serve as a bridge out of poverty,” says Jim Yong Kim, President at the World Bank.

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How to Bring the Holiday Spirit of Giving into Work

Up and Running

When I was in high school, my friends and I set up a giving tree outside the school library, as a fundraiser for the Harambee Centre, an organization which provides, among other things, ambulatory services; and which builds schools for children in Kenya, Tanzania, and Uganda. The holidays are a great time to foster a positive workplace culture, as well as give charitably to your community.

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The 5 Types of Employees You’ll Find on Your Startup Journey (and How to Manage Them)

Up and Running

He was joking, of course—your employees aren’t a bunch of animals struggling for survival at a watering hole in Tanzania—but they sure will act like it sometimes. Several years ago, when I was just starting out as an entrepreneur, a friend introduced me to a concept he called “Serengeti Management.” His premise was that, as a new employer, I was going to have to deal with any number of different personalities, each represented by a creature you might find roaming the plains of East Africa.

Rethinking Impact Investing

thebarefootvc

My parents, who were both born and raised in different parts of Tanzania, were determined to show us the material poverty (and outsized generosity) of people on our first trip to India. Impact investing, venture philanthropy and social entrepreneurship are all areas in practice and theory that have been close to my heart for years. As regular readers of my blog know, I was born in Nairobi and grew up visiting the developing world in the 1980s, after my family moved to the United States.

Small Business Spotlight of the Week: TripBucket

crowdSPRING Blog

While living my personal Dream to Summit Mount Kilimanjaro in Tanzania we took the website live, literally as I was hiking up the mountain. Did you know that January is the considered by pseudoscience to be the most depressing month ? The holidays are over, the days are still short and, if you live in the Midwest, it means day-dreaming on how you’re going to get out of this icy, cold, snow-filled landscape.

Development Through Self Empowerment

thebarefootvc

I have spent a lot of time thinking about aid to developing nations, especially after my summer working on a UNIDO (United Nations Development Organization) project in Tanzania training women entrepreneurs. While in Rwanda, I went on long drives, for it’s the only way to see this beautiful country. Some roads are paved but many are not — one day, it took us 10 hours to travel a little over 200 kilometers on a bumpy dirt road winding through the hills.

A Glimpse: My American Dream

thebarefootvc

When I looked at my inbox this morning, I had emails from six organizations I have advised/worked with over the past couple of years (including Astia and Techstars ) announcing their partnership with the White House’s Startup America initiative. And, lest I for a moment forgot that I am living the American dream, thanks to parents who left a life that they loved to give me an even better one, it was once again etched in my mind. It seems like yesterday (although it was 1989!)

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Out of the Crisis #21: Tomas Pueyo on the hammer and the dance, political polarization, and how the pandemic will affect the way we live and work

Startup Lessons Learned

In mid-March, as the coronavirus was sweeping through Asia and Europe, Tomas Pueyo published a piece on Medium titled "The Hammer and the Dance: What the Next 18 Months Can Look Like if Leaders Buy Us Time." One of a series he wrote after starting to analyze pandemic data in mid-February, the piece was shared by millions in multiple languages. It turned him instantly from an education technology expert--his day job is as VP of Growth at Course Hero--into a leading voice for how to move forward.